Help stop the Keystone XL pipeline through Canada and the U.S

A defining climate decision

The US government is about to make the defining climate decision of Obama’s presidency — whether to approve a monstrous pipeline that will transport up to 830,000 barrels a day of the world’s dirtiest oil from Canada across the US.

First proposed by Calgary-based TransCanada in 2008, the $7 billion, 875-mile pipeline would carry up to 830,000 barrels of crude oil per day from Alberta’s tar sand reserves to a vast oil depot in Oklahoma, and eventually to refineries near Houston.

The ultimate decision lies with President Obama, who told an audience at Georgetown University in June that he wouldn’t approve the pipeline if it would “significantly exacerbate” the problem of carbon emissions.

Reports on the pipeline

Last month, the State Department released its Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement on the pipeline. The report concluded the pipeline would not significantly exacerbate greenhouse gas emissions because Canadian tar sands would get to market regardless of whether the pipeline was built—a claim environmental activists immediately rejected, and they got to work rallying and lobbying against the pipeline. Retiring California Rep. Henry Waxman, one of the green movement’s fiercest advocates on Capitol Hill, added that “while still flawed, this environmental review recognizes that the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline could have a significant effect on carbon pollution.”

The potential damage

If approved, the Keystone XL pipeline will help pump billions of dollars into the pockets of a few companies, but also millions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere. It’s been called “a fuse to the biggest carbon bomb on the planet”. Tar sands oil is the dirtiest dirty fossil fuel ever cooked up – releasing 3-4 times the global warming pollution of normal petrol.

“Essentially, it’s game over for the planet.” – Dr James Hansen, former NASA scientist

Supporting Avaaz

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Avaaz as they encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

Three years ago, this pipeline was a foregone conclusion. But then people-power swung into action — thousands were arrested at the largest act of civil disobedience in the US in decades, and Obama refused the initial proposal. By joining with Avaaz, we can make this happen again by collecting the most international comments EVER for a US government decision and give Secretary Kerry and President Obama the public cover they need to reject the Keystone carbon bomb.

Sign the petition now:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/stop_the_keystone_xl_pipeline_loc/?fp

Spread the word and send this article on 5 arguments against keystone to all your friends and family:

http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/02/28/they-said-it-5-quotes-condemning-keystone-xl-pipeline?cmpid=tp-ptnr-upworthy

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