Animal experimentation: debunking the myths

Animal experimentation

Animal experimentation is a controversial issue. Those that support it argue that it is necessary if we are to find cures for human ailments, and those against it maintain that it is cruel and unnecessary, and even misleading.

There is a public misconception that animals used in experiments are protected through the presence of ethics committees, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act and the Code of Practice. There is also the view that it is “only” rats and mice that are used. The truth is that many animals are being used unnecessarily in experimentation, including cats, dogs, primates and rabbits. Horrific procedures are carried out on all sorts of animals – procedures that the general public is largely unaware of.

Humane Research Australia

Humane Research Australia Inc. (HRA) is a not for profit organisation that challenges the use of animals in research and promotes the use of more humane and scientifically-valid non animal methodologies.

“HRA’s vision is one where scientific establishments are lined with significant achievement awards instead of cages; where inappropriate animal models are replaced with progressive technologies and where every patient receiving lifesaving medications can be confident knowing that their treatments have been safely and thoroughly tested through methodologies that are directly relevant to humans.” – http://www.humaneresearch.org.au/about/

Debunking the myths

HRA has produced a broadcast of a six-part series about the use of animals in research. It features Dr Andrew Knight, DipECAWBM (WSEL), PhD, MRCVS, FOCAE and is based on his critically-acclaimed book The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments.

These can be viewed online:

Animal Experiments – a failing science
Efficacy – accessing the utility of animal experiments
Statistics and Regulation
Non-animal Methods of Research – a more humane and scientifically valid option
Humane Education – caring, not killing
Working Together For Change

Supporting Humane Research Australia

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.
The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as Humane Research Australia as they encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

Support HRA and the end of animal experimentation

You can support HRA in their quest to end animal experimentation by becoming a HRA member or monthly donor. Your contribution will allow them to continue the fight to end unethical and inhumane animal research in Australia.

http://www.humaneresearch.org.au/membership-donations

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