You can protect bears from the bear bile industry

In October, 2013, the World Society for the Protection of Animals launched their campaign, Protect This Bear, to protect bears around the world, with the immediate focus on tackling the bear bile industry.

What is the bear bile industry?

Across East and South East Asia, thousands of bears are being held in captive in the bile industry. These bears are held in captivity to harvest bile, a digestive juice produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder. Bile is a valuable commodity in these countries, and is used in some traditional medicine as well as new non-traditional cosmetic and lifestyle products.

Bile extraction process

wspa-620
source:
https://www.protectthisbear.org.au/

The bears are trapped in tiny cages throughout the bile extraction process. A hole is repeatedly punched through the bear’s skin and the bile is extracted from their gall bladder, an extremely painful process for the bears.

“To their owners the bears are nameless money machines. They don’t see their personality or care about their pain. I believe bears deserve better.” – Luke Nicholson, Project Manager for Bears in the Wild, WSPA Asia-Pacific.

WSPA’s Protect this Bear Campaign

WSPA’s campaign aims to expose the cruelty of the bear bile industry, and to work towards making sure that their vision is realised: of all wild animals being protected in the wild, not used, abused, farmed or sold.

Since 2005, WSPA’s work has helped reduce, by half, the number of bears kept in cruel bear bile facilities in Vietnam.

WSPA’s vision

WSPA’s vision is a world where animal welfare matters and animal cruelty has ended. They work directly with animals and with the people and organisations that can ensure animals are treated with respect and compassion.

“With your support, we campaign effectively to combat the world’s most intense and large-scale animal welfare issues. We bring about lasting change by:

  • helping people understand the critical importance of good animal welfare
  • encouraging nations to commit to animal-friendly practices
  • building the scientific case for the better treatment of animals.” – www.protectthisbear.org.au/

Supporting WSPA

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support such organisations as WSPA, as they encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

Support WSPA’s campaign

You can help bring a halt to the bear bile industry by supporting WSPA’s campaign, Protect This Bear. All funds raised go towards all of WSPA’s work to prevent animal cruelty around the world, including the protection of bears.

https://www.protectthisbear.org.au/donate/

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: