Archive | August 2014

You can support Oxfam’s fight for gender equality

The story

Oxfam’s new report, The G20 and gender equality – How the G20 can advance women’s rights in employment, social protection and fiscal policies , highlights the role of the G20 group of countries in taking action on gender inequality. According to that report, women can expect to wait another 75 years before they receive the same amount of pay as their male counterparts. And in their efforts to stamp out poverty, gender equality matters because 70 per cent of the 1.3 billion people living in poverty are women and girls.

Discrimination

“In G20 countries and beyond, women are paid less than men, do most of the unpaid labour, are over-represented in part-time work, and are discriminated against in the household, in markets and in institutions.

The report states if the hidden contribution of women were valued – for instance, caring for children or carrying out housework– the GDP of individual G20 countries could increase by 20- 60 per cent.

That’s why it’s imperative the G20 agenda must address systemic discrimination and economic exclusion of women across G20 countries.” – Oxfam

Putting equality in the G20 agenda

While G20 countries have made the commitment to tackle the barriers to women’s full economic and social participation, we now need to see action.

Discrimination and injustice are major causes of poverty worldwide, and women and girls bear the brunt of it in all aspects of their lives.

We can work together to call on Tony Abbott as leader of the Australian presidency of the G20 to put inequality firmly on the G20 agenda.

Supporting Oxfam

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

Support gender equality and put extreme inequality on the G20 agenda

Do your part for gender equality and addressing inequality at G20:

https://www.oxfam.org.au/2014/07/75-years-to-achieve-equal-pay-is-too-long/

Tell Tony Abbott to put extreme and growing inequality firmly on the G20 agenda:

https://www.oxfam.org.au/my/act/put-extreme-inequality-on-the-g20-agenda/?utm_source=gender-blog

Save the Sumatran tiger and the Indonesian rainforests!

Tigers in Indonesia

Tigers have been around for a very long time. Tiger fossils found in China are estimated to be up to 2 million years old. A century ago, as many as 100,000 wild tigers inhabited Asia. Now, we’ve lost 97% of those big cats, leaving around 3,000 in the wild today. The primary threat is loss of habitat with up to 80% of suitable forest in Indonesia having been lost in the past 20 years. The average annual rate of forest loss in Indonesia was 498,000 hectares from 2000 to 2010, or the equivalent of over 55 rugby fields per hour.

Loss of habitat

Deforestation for palm oil is driving Sumatran tigers toward extinction. As few as 400 tigers are thought to remain in the rainforests of Sumatra, which are vanishing at a staggering rate. Expansion of oil palm and pulpwood plantations was responsible for nearly two-thirds of the destruction of tiger habitat from 2009 to 2011, the most recent period for which official Indonesian government data are available. Such destruction fragments the extensive tracts of rainforest over which tigers need to range in order to hunt. Even Sumatran tiger habitat in protected areas such as the world-famous Tesso Nilo National Park has been virtually destroyed by encroachment or illegal palm oil production, and government officials acknowledge that protection for such areas exists only on paper.

Greenpeace protecting paradise

Greenpeace are working on a campaign to protect the Indonesian rainforests from being cut down and turned into palm oil plantations.

“There are solutions that don’t involve forest destruction. We want clean palm oil and we ask that our favourite brands listen to our voices. We believe immediate action must be taken to stop habitat destruction finding its way into the products we love. We have the right to know if our favourite products are linked to tiger extinction.” – Greenpeace

Supporting Greenpeace

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

You can help!

“The last home of the Sumatran tiger is being destroyed to make the products we love. Join the thousands taking action to Protect Paradise.” – Greenpeace

Sign now:

https://www.greenpeace.org.au/action/?cid=62

 

Join in for the Global People’s Climate March, on September 21st

Global day of action

In September, world leaders are coming to New York City for a UN summit on the climate crisis. The People’s Climate March (PCM) is an upcoming large-scale activist event to advocate global action against climate change, scheduled to take place on Sunday, September 21, 2014 in New York City. Organizers intend the march to be “the largest single event on climate that has been organized to date… one so large and diverse that it cannot be ignored.” UN Secretary­ General Ban Ki-­moon is urging governments to support an ambitious global agreement to dramatically reduce global warming pollution.

A need for action

Our future is on the line. We need to act now to create a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities.

“If Germany on a sunny day can generate half its power from solar panels, and Texas makes a third of its electricity from wind, then you know technology isn’t an impossible obstacle anymore. The pieces are in place, but the pieces won’t move themselves. That’s where movements come in.”

Bill McKibben, Rolling Stone

Avaaz’s global action

With Avaaz, you can join the march for climate change.

“With the simple act of adding your name you’ll be starting on a journey towards one of the defining moments in history. Our greatest hope to tackle the challenge of global warming rests with us and our ability to demand greater action from world leaders.” – Avaaz

Supporting Amnesty International

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

Join the global weekend of action

“We know that no single meeting or summit will “solve climate change” and in many ways this moment will not even really be about the summit. We want this moment to be about us – the people who are standing up in our communities, to organise, to build power, to confront the power of fossil fuels, and to shift power to a just, safe, peaceful world. To do that, we need to act – together.”             – http://peoplesclimate.org/global/

Sign up with Avaaz now to show your support:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/join_to_change_everything_rb/?slideshow

Help repeal harmful laws in Morocco, Algeria & Tunisia

Morocco

In March 2012, 16 year old Amina Filali committed suicide by swallowing rat poison. She had been raped in her small Moroccan town by a man she was then forced to marry. Moroccan law allowed rapists to escape prosecution by marrying victims under age 18. In Morocco and elsewhere in the Middle East and North Africa, such acts are often seen to restore the ‘honour’ of the victim and her family. But Amina could not live with her restored ‘honour.’

This loophole in Moroccan law was unanimously abolished by parliament on 22 January 2014. The change in law was a significant step forward for women in Morocco. However, there is still work to be done to protect the survivors of sexual violence in Morocco. The severity of punishment for rape still depends on whether the victim was a virgin or not.

Algeria and Tunisia

In Algeria and Tunisia the law still allows rapists to avoid prosecution by marrying their teenage victims. In Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco the law fails to protect survivors of sexual violence. Legal provisions relating to rape emphasize ‘morality’ and ‘decency’ rather than the personal and the bodily integrity of the victim.

Amnesty International’s campaign

Rape is one of the most extreme forms of violence against women and girls. The law, the police, and the justice system must protect women and girls. Rapists need to know that there is no way to escape prison. And victims need to be supported, rather than stigmatized.

“Amnesty’s global movement is standing with our staff and activists in Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria as they report on human rights abuses and campaign for changes in the law there. They are continuing to petition, demonstrate and collect testimony just as activists globally are putting pressure the Algerian, Tunisian and Moroccan embassies in their country and their own governments.” – Amnesty International

Supporting Amnesty International

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

You can call on the Algerian, Moroccan and Tunisian authorities to meet their human rights obligations by adopting comprehensive laws and policies that protect women and girls against sexual violence:

https://campaigns.amnesty.org/actions/stop-making-excuses-for-sexual-violence