Help Tereza feed her children in Mozambique

What’s happening?

Mozambique is one of the most disaster prone countries in the world. Regular droughts cause life-threatening hunger for the many people relying on crops to survive.

An alarming 44% of children under five in Mozambique are stunted (WHO, 2013).

In Mozambique, families depend mostly on crops for survival. Besides growing food to consume at home, the produce is a valuable source of income. But in a country recognised as one of the most disaster prone countries in the world, regular drought can mean severe hunger for entire communities.

In the poorest and hardest hit areas of Mozambique, men often leave the family home to migrate to surrounding countries to look for work. It was in these circumstances that Tereza’s husband died as he attempted to cross the South African border — his last option to provide for his family.

For Tereza and her children, hunger is a daily reality. Her home is about a 10 minute drive from the main road. It’s surrounded by trees and feels very secluded. Her only neighbour is her mother-in-law; since her husband died, Tereza has lived alone with her four children.

At night they sleep in a small round hut with mud walls and share just one blanket between them. Life here is very basic, Tereza lives from day to day not knowing where the next meal will come from.

“Children don’t understand. When they want something to eat I am the one who has to worry about it. The grown ones do complain if they are hungry and the little ones cry. I tell them to keep quiet and wait until I prepare the food. The older ones do keep quiet because they understand, but the little ones may cry because they don’t know that I don’t have money. They just carry on crying,” said Tereza.

What can we do?

By introducing the tools and skills they need to grow a garden in the desert, you could help create a different future – one where everyone has enough to eat.

Please donate today to help mothers like Tereza grow a garden in the desert of Mozambique.

Supporting Oxfam

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

You can help

Your donation can help stop hunger in Mozambique:

https://www.oxfam.org.au/my/donate/stop-hunger-in-mozambique/

 

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