Join with Amnesty International and stand with Indigenous kids in Australia

What’s the story?

Children that feel connected to their family and community have healthy, happy childhoods that allow them to flourish and will set them up for life. But our government is separating Indigenous kids from their communities. Kids as young as ten years old are being locked up in jails and detention centres, all across Australia. Indigenous kids are 24 times more likely to be locked up than their non-Indigenous classmates.

“By locking up kids as young as ten, we are repeating our past mistakes and threatening our future as a fair, just and harmonious community.” – Amnesty International

Amnesty International’s research

Amnesty International Australia’s researchers have gathered the full story on Australia’s high rate of Indigenous youth incarceration and released the report, “A brighter tomorrow: keeping Indigenous kids in the community and out of detention in Australia.”  This report details how the Australian Government can reduce the numbers of young Indigenous people incarcerated across the country.

“Amnesty’s researchers have identified many brilliant Indigenous-led solutions to keep Indigenous kids in communities for a brighter tomorrow. But first the Australian Government needs to meet its international legal obligations, and provide ongoing federal funding to these successful Indigenous-led initiatives.” – Amnesty International

These Indigenous-led community programs will be able to support Indigenous children, and if they get in trouble, help them address the reasons why. With our help, we can speak up for a brighter future for Indigenous kids.

Supporting Amnesty International

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

Show your support and sign up to a ‘commitment to kids’. We can show our government that Australians everywhere believe in better solutions than locking kids up. Amnesty International will be sending our messages of support to politicians across Australia.

“Australians — Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike — stand together for harmonious communities and a brighter tomorrow.” – Amnesty International

Act now and sign the petition:

http://www.amnesty.org.au/action/action/37304/

 

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