Join with Oxfam to help the victims of the devastating earthquake in Nepal

 

What’s happening?

On Saturday 25 April 2015, a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal. It was followed by hundreds of aftershocks and, just days later, a second 6.7 magnitude earthquake. The earthquakes caused widespread destruction in 13 districts, including in the capital Kathmandu, and tragically left 8,857 people dead.

An estimated 8 million people — more than a quarter of the population — have been affected, and at least 600,000 houses were completely destroyed with another 280,000 damaged. There are millions of people in Nepal relying on humanitarian aid and it will take them many years to rebuild homes and livelihoods.

Oxfam’s efforts

Oxfam and other organisations began work within hours of the first earthquake and continue to respond to the ongoing humanitarian needs. As the response moves from initial emergency relief to longer-term recovery, ensuring those affected have access to clean water and sanitation, shelter, food and livelihoods support remains our focus.

Oxfam has been providing emergency relief to communities in seven of the worst affected areas — Gorkha, Nuwakot, Sindhupalchok, Dhading and three districts in Kathmandu. This has included providing clean water, toilets, hygiene kits, emergency shelter, food and rice seeds.

While communities are beginning to recover from the initial devastation, there is still an enormous need for humanitarian support and ongoing assistance to rebuild homes and livelihoods. During the ongoing recovery through the winter months, Oxfam will distribute warm clothing, hot water bottles, mattresses, and blankets as well as items to insulate shelter such as thermal floor mats, tarpaulins and groundsheets. Shelter for livestock and dry storage for food supplies will also be crucial to ensure communities can survive the winter.

Supporting Oxfam

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

Oxfam teams have been in Nepal responding with lifesaving essentials — clean water, sanitation and emergency shelter — and helping the people of Nepal to rebuild and recover. Your generosity will help. Please give what you can today.

https://www.oxfam.org.au/my/donate/earthquake-devastates-nepal

 

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