Join with Animals Australia to stop koalas becoming industry casualties

What’s happening?

Logging companies that export timber and woodchips for paper production overseas have been exposed for recklessly felling the homes of vulnerable wildlife. When footage of maimed and dead koalas was aired on television in 2013, one of the companies involved denied any animals were being killed — before ultimately being forced to make a public apology. Now, new footage has emerged that has once again exposed the grave risk to koalas when the self-regulating logging industry is left to its own devices.

Koalas have become the silent victims of international paper production. In July 2013, ABC’s 7.30 exposed the maiming and killing of countless koalas on plantations in Victoria and South Australia. With dwindling natural habitats, some koalas turned to Blue Gum plantations for refuge. But when logging began in these plantations, an animal welfare disaster unfolded. With no apparent plan to relocate the local inhabitants, and without any government monitoring, trees were simply being cut down with animals still in them.

Animals Australia’s efforts

Volunteer wildlife carers struggled to keep up with the number of casualties — koalas suffering from broken limbs and backs, severed arms and impact wounds. Many more don’t even survive the fall. Witnesses described injured koalas still on the felled trees as they were pulled through the shredders. Following the flood of complaints after the 7:30 report, the Environmental Auditor for Australian Bluegum Plantations launched an investigation and subsequently released a damning report, citing “major non-conformances”, and removed their FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) license. Harvesting operations were also suspended in in large areas of koala habitat.

The Victorian Department for Environment & Primary Industries has since admitted that they rely on timber companies to self-report wildlife issues. And yet one of the major companies responsible continued to deny there was anything wrong until this cruelty was publicly exposed. What’s clear is that self-regulation is failing, and stronger protection for wildlife is needed. At a minimum, the detection, capture and relocation of koalas (and other at risk wildlife) needs to occur under government supervision before forest areas are logged.

Supporting Animals Australia

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

Be a voice for koalas and other wildlife. Please call on the Victorian Ministers responsible to introduce stronger protection for wildlife, so that this never happens again.

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/koalas-under-threat/

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: