Join with Animals Australia to demand animals not be treated as ‘waste products’

 

What’s happening?

The dairy industry is one of the least understood animal industries, responsible for sending hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby calves to slaughter every year. Only a public outcry can bring hope for a kinder future for these calves.

The dairy industry enjoys a carefully crafted public image that leaves many consumers with visions of happy animals and green rolling hills. In reality this tenuous image masks a history of animal abuse, which continues unabated due to a lack of public awareness.

Many milk drinkers are shocked to learn that dairy cows are kept almost continually pregnant in order to maximise their production of milk — milk that nature intended for their baby calves. Once born, bewildered calves are separated from their grieving mothers and routinely killed as ‘waste products’ before they are even a week old. Already born to a terrible fate, the dairy industry recently lobbied government to prevent reforms, and it remains legally permissible to withhold liquid food from these unwanted calves for the last 30 hours of their lives as they are trucked and prepared for slaughter.

Animals Australia’s efforts

The dairy industry has long operated under a veil of secrecy. They know that many consumers of milk would find the callous treatment of bobby calves completely unacceptable and rethink their financial support of the industry. If the treatment of bobby calves is to improve, it is imperative that the industry becomes accountable and for the public to exercise their consumer power.

Supporting Animals Australia

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment, and as such we support organisations that encompass similar ideals.

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

How you can help

Please show Dairy Australia that the community is watching and that informed consumers will never accept the callous treatment of thinking, feeling animals as mere ‘waste products’.

“As a consumer who likes to be able to make informed decisions, I am alarmed to discover the apparent disregard for the welfare of these vulnerable animals. Such a betrayal of trust will tarnish the dairy industry’s public image, unless positive steps are made to ensure these calves are treated more humanely.”

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/take_action/bobby-calf-cruelty

 

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