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Sleep problems that affect children and how to overcome them; a short guide

 

It’s quite common for children, at some point, to have trouble getting and staying asleep at night. To help them overcome these problems, it’s important to first discover the cause of their sleep problems. Outlined here are a few sleep problems that can affect children and ways to overcome them;

1] Noisy bedtime routine. Too much noise and excitement before bed will make it hard for children to settle down. It’s best to leave the 20 minutes before bedtime as quiet time – where children can read a story before bed and wind down.

2] Eating habits. Chocolate and soda drinks have a lot of sugar in them and this can keep children hyped up before bed, making it hard for them to fall asleep at their bed time. To ensure they get a good night’s rest, make sure they avoid these foods from the late afternoon onwards.

3] Nightmares and night terrors. If children are prone to waking up in the night scared and crying, they may be having nightmares or night terrors. To help them through this, they may need a visit to the doctor if their behaviour is severe. They may also benefit from a night light in their room, to help them fall asleep without being scared.

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

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10 tips to help children get a better night’s sleep

 

Children sometimes find it hard to get to sleep at night, and this can be a frustrating time for everyone in the family. If you can get children into a sleep routine, a good night’s sleep will follow and they’ll wake up refreshed, following a night of good quality sleep. A few tips to help children sleep through the night are;

  1. Set up a bedtime routine, including a regular time for going to bed at night to encourage good sleep patterns. The routine can include a bath after dinner, brushing teeth and reading a bedtime story.
  2. Relax before bedtime. It’s best to wind down at least 20 minutes before going to bed, with a bedtime story, listening to quiet soothing music or practising some bedtime meditation.
  3. Have regular sleep and wake times, as this helps keep children’s body clock in a regular pattern.
  4. If children are older than 5 years old, avoid daytime naps as this will make it harder for children to stay asleep through the night.
  5. Make sure there aren’t any extenuating reasons children aren’t sleeping at night – are they scared of the monster in the closet? Your child might need a night light to help them fall asleep.
  6. Make sure the bedroom is not too light, too noisy or too uncomfortable to sleep in.
  7. Put away the clocks and watches so children aren’t checking on the time when they should be sleeping.
  8. Ensure nutritional needs are being met – eating too much or too little at night will lead to an uncomfortable night’s sleep.
  9. Make sure children are getting plenty of natural light in the day – natural light from the sun suppresses melatonin, which helps you feel awake during the day and sleepy towards bedtime.
  10. Avoid caffeine! Children won’t be drinking coffee or energy drinks, but there is also caffeine in chocolate and cola, so they should be avoided in the afternoon.

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

Positive bedtime routines to encourage sleep in toddlers; a short guide

 

If you’re looking to help children get to sleep at night, one of the best ways to manage this is to set up positive bedtime routines that you follow each night. This can help calm and soothe your child in the 20 minutes before bedtime, helping them to feel settled in for the night. If your child is getting to sleep later than you would like, you can start the routine earlier each night, gradually moving the bedtime earlier each night, until the desired time is reached.

The key to positive bedtime routines is to do similar activities in the same way each night, at least 20 minutes before your child’s bedtime. The activities can include things like having a bath, brushing teeth, reading a book or listening to classical music. For example, after dinner your child could take a bath, then spend 15 minutes reading a book or having a story read to them, before being put to bed with a goodnight kiss and cuddle. With positive bedtime routines in place, you can improve settling problems, decrease the number of times your child calls out to you at night, and this will in turn lead to better parent-child relationships.

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

Recognising the signs of tiredness in toddlers and babies; a short guide

 

It can be difficult to recognise when babies or toddlers are tired, as we may not know what to look for and it can be hard to deduce a reason for their crying. Furthermore, when babies and toddlers get overtired, they find it harder to get to sleep. Thus it is vital to be able to spot the signs of tiredness so that you are able to settle your child to sleep before they get overtired.

Some of the tell-tale signs of tiredness in a newborn baby are;

  • pulling at ears
  • closing fists
  • yawning
  • fluttering eyelids or difficulty focusing, going cross-eyed or staring into space
  • making jerky arm and leg movements, or arching backwards
  • frowning or looking worried
  • sucking on fingers

At the age of 3 – 6 months, a baby might be tired after being awake for 1.5 – 3 hours.

At the age of 6 – 12 months, a baby might be tired after being awake for 2 – 3 hours.

At the age of 12 – 18 months, a baby might be tired if they miss their morning or afternoon nap.

Some of the tell-tale signs of tiredness in a baby or toddler are;

  • clumsiness
  • clinginess
  • grizzling or crying
  • demands for constant attention
  • boredom with toys
  • fussiness with food.

 The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

The importance of sleep; a short guide

 

Sleep is important for everyone – we spend about 1/3 of our lives sleeping – but there are differences between our needs based on if we are babies, children or adults. The amount of time we spend in light and deep sleep varies depending on age.

A lot happens in our bodies and brains while we sleep. Babies and children spend so much time sleeping because their bodies and brains have a lot of growing to do while they sleep, and when it’s dark, children’s bodies produce a growth hormone. Researchers believe too little sleep can affect growth and the immune system. Studies also show that kids who regularly get an adequate amount of sleep have improved attention, behaviour, learning, memory, and overall mental and physical health.

Sleep consists of ‘light sleep’ also known as Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, and ‘deep sleep’, also called Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. Babies are biologically programmed to sleep more lightly and wake more often than adults. Cycles of deep and light sleep last 30-50 minutes in babies, then gradually increase in length across childhood. In adolescence and during the adult years, each cycle of deep and light sleep lasts about 90 minutes.

Sleep is important for everyone, but especially so for babies and children. It’s an essential part of everyone’s routine and an indispensable part of a healthy lifestyle.

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

News; The UK government brings in new laws and workplace rights to support families who suffer the loss of a child

 

The UK government is leading the way by bringing in new laws to support families who suffer the loss of a child. Parents and carers will be eligible for paid leave when they suffer a loss of a child under 18, and employees will not have to give notice for leave immediately after a loss, nor will they need to supply a copy of a death certificate to use as evidence. This is the first law of its kind in the UK to support employees and give them time to grieve.

Those who are eligible under this Parental Bereavement (Pay and Leave) Act include; parents, and all primary carers for children, including adopters, foster parents, guardians, and also kinship carers – a close relative or family friend that has assumed responsibility for the care of the child in the absence of the parents.

“Dealing with the loss of a child is an awful tragedy which we recognise people will deal with differently. It is important this new law is designed so that people are given the space and respect to grieve in their own way.” – Kelly Tolhurst, Business Minister

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/

 

News; Vital changes to foster laws being considered by NSW Parliament

 

The NSW Parliament is considering making some vital change to current foster laws. These changes are seeking to streamline decision-making about permanent placements for children who enter out-of-home care. For the children who enter out-of-home care, they have been removed from the care of their parents, and the average length of stay in out-of-home care for them is about 12 years – this can be almost the entire duration of their childhood.

The changes being considered aim to reduce this time to a maximum of two years, with the potential for children to return to their parents where possible. Where this is not possible, the aim would be an alternative legal arrangement of guardianship with a relative, or adoption by a foster carer. Long-term foster care would be the least preferred option.

“With the greater focus on achieving permanent homes, it is important that NSW policies and legislation consider the lessons from other jurisdictions that have made similar attempts. In the US, the Adoption and Safe Families Act has been criticised for its bias towards termination of parental rights and adoption over restoration, with inadequate timeframes and support services that do not allow birth parents to so their children can be returned to them.”

– Associate Professor Amy Conley Wright & Professor Judith Cashmore

The reforms would require appropriate funding for resourcing to strengthen and support families, as well as monitoring and research to check for unintended consequences and to ensure the reforms are for the benefit of the children they are meant to help.

The Wishing Well foundation

The Wishing Well was established in 2010 to offer children in out-of-home care, such as foster care and residential care, a range of healing and treatment options usually not accessible as a free therapy in mainstream health.

The Wishing Well raises funds to enable children and young people to access developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments shown to be highly effective in dealing with severe trauma and neglect. These therapies respond to the unique needs of each child and young person.

The Wishing Well is a not-for-profit incorporated charity organisation, established and managed by people seeking to improve outcomes for children and young people in out-of-home care and their families. The Wishing Well recognises the importance of the act of giving. We recognise the significance of the participation of community members and all donations are most appreciated.

The Wishing Well operates ethically, effectively and empathically with a view to achieving quality outcomes and a satisfying working environment.

Support the Wishing Well

The Wishing Well uses its funds to help children in need access all manners of developmentally-appropriate and trauma-informed treatments. The Wishing Well takes referrals for any child/young person in out-of-home care in NSW.  Applications are assessed by qualified personnel and on a case-by-case basis.  The decision to fund an application is affected by the following:

  • Funding availability
  • The support the child/young person has to access the proposed therapies
  • The capacity and willingness of the Carer Household to support the child/young person
  • Assessment, which recommends and supports the proposed therapy as relevant to meeting the particular needs of the child/young person

The Wishing Well gratefully receives donations, funding and resources through bequests, corporate partnerships, fundraising events, grants, online donations and other fund raising activities. Money donated to The Wishing Well enables traumatised children access to healing therapies. Please see our website for more information:

http://thewishingwell.org.au/